Interview: First digital dyslexia platform for bilingual students

May 4, 2021

This week, Help A Teacher, hosted by Hal Bowman, features Dr. Elsa Cárdenas-Hagan and Dr. Judy Rich to discuss Amplio’s latest launch: Esperanza – a First of its Kind Digital Spanish-Language Dyslexia Curriculum.

Esperanza is offered by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) on Amplio’s digital intervention platform to all 1,029 school districts at no cost.

By addressing specific sounds, words and general reading concepts, interventionists can use Esperanza to provide differentiated and individualized therapy for Spanish-speaking or bilingual students with dyslexia. Utilizing advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence and natural language processing, the platform functions as an extension of the interventionist by assessing student responses and providing visual and audio cues to support the lesson.

Dr. Cárdenas-Hagan, the developer of Esperanza, is a bilingual speech-language pathologist, a Certified Academic Language Therapist, and a nationally recognized dyslexia expert, author and speaker. She’s the chair of the national joint committee of learning disabilities, the past vice-chairperson of the International Dyslexia Association, among many other achievements. She is also the President of Valley Speech Language and Learning Center in Brownsville, Texas

Dr. Rich, CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, 2021 President-Elect of ASHA, Former Assistant Superintendent for Student Services in Irving ISD, Texas, an education consultant and lecturer at The University of Texas at Dallas, and a member of Amplio’s Advisory Board. She worked in public schools for 35 years as a campus SLP, program specialist for speech and language services, special education director, executive director, and assistant superintendent for student services.

Earlier this year, Amplio and TEA launched an English-language dyslexia digital intervention platform utilizing the Multisensory Teaching Approach (MTA), developed by Margaret Taylor Smith, which is also available to all Texas school districts at no cost. Esperanza is the first Spanish-language dyslexia curriculum of its kind. 

Watch the interview here: